#WhyIDidntReport #GetStern

Arielle Shipe is an Instagram Influencer:

https://www.instagram.com/arielleshipe/

We talked about equality for women and how she used to only allow herself 500 calories a day.

Arielle is a proud member of the Stern Marketing Academy

Connect with Arielle:

https://www.arielleshipe.com/

Darrell Stern:
To really succeed, you’ve got you get stern and we’re going to talk to all of our amazing guests about how they do just that. This is Darrell Stern live from Denver, Colorado with the Other Stern Show.

Darrell Stern:
Hey, this is Darrell Stern reporting live from the offices of Stern Storming, the Stern Marketing Academy here in … It’s sunny today. It’s nice today. We’re having a [hot-tember 00:00:00:27], Aurora, Colorado, and this is the show by a podcast called the Other Stern Show. And I have changed the format of this show into a round table where you can literally just come on and talk about a specific issue. So tonight’s topic is called the equality and how we get stern in that terminology, in that term equality.

Darrell Stern:
How do we treat others equally? How do we learn and figure out how to bring other people into our lives equally, and how do we see the inequalities in the world at the same time and what do we do about them? So, I’m going to jump right in here. I have an awesome, awesome, awesome, awesome super influencer guest that I can’t even believe who’s going to talk to little old me. I swear, I can’t even believe this, so watch. So, this is Arielle Shipe. I’m going to bring her on the show right now. She is an amazing, amazing young woman, an amazing entrepreneur, and she has created and is creating a whole brand around herself and her life called the Dream Life Revolution. So, you guys are ready to spin everything around and start getting rid of those limiting beliefs that crap in your head, turn your whole life around. This young lady is the one to do it. So Arielle, welcome to the show.

Arielle Shipe:
Thank you. Thanks for inviting me on.

Darrell Stern:
Yeah, it’s super awesome. So, I’m going to post the link. Guys, this is our open round table show. It’s the craziest thing that I do all week. So I’m going to post the link in here and while I’m doing that, Arielle, why don’t you tell everybody a little bit about yourself, about your life here in Colorado. Some of the things that made you who you are today. Be they your parents, what they said, or your teachers, or even the people in your business. What are some of the experiences that you had growing up that helped you figure out what you get stern about, what your rules on life are?

Arielle Shipe:
Yeah, I mean, I think that all of us learn way more from our challenges than we learn from, say, big successes, so a lot of the things that have shaped who I am today are definitely from the challenges that I faced in my life. When you’re a woman … so the whole conversation on equality is actually really powerful and potent and nice because when you’re growing up as a young woman, especially in this day and age where everything is … there’s so much media and there’s so much exposure to media at such a young age. There’s so much pressure on people, but especially on young women.

Arielle Shipe:
I think there’s a lot of pressure on men too. But you see it a lot in the young women and when I was growing up, there was a lot of pressure to look a certain way. I grew up in a really affluent area and I wasn’t from an affluent family. So that was a lot of pressure. So I grew up with not so healthy relationship with food, kind of the whole eating disorder background thing. So that was that first roadblock that made me start to learn a little bit more about myself and about what I wanted. Why I was here and what is the purpose of all it? What am I worth? Am I worth more than 500 calories a day? So that was kind of that first tipping point.

Darrell Stern:
Okay. So, with that, what were some of the times when you were looking into a mirror and you said, “Wow, I don’t want to touch any more food, because my gosh…” And I think it goes deeper than the weight. Right? Or even the appearance. It’s like, “Oh my gosh, I won’t be worthy. I won’t be enough.” Right? What do you think, first off, planted that in your mind in the first place? Is it literally just media and seeing other women and thinking, “My God, I have to be like that?” Or was it something else in your home or … You know what I’m saying. Home or whatever, or something that planted a seed that made you start to regress into that.

Arielle Shipe:
It’s so hard to say because I feel like my family was always so supportive, so I don’t ever feel like it came from that. It was almost this intrinsic self-pressure. I put so much pressure on myself to live up to these certain standards and I think, if I’m being honest, I was pretty successful in a lot of the things that I did. I was good at sports, was good at school, and so I started off with this bar for myself. [Inaudible 00:04:59] to want to better yourself and always improve. But then when you start with this bar up here, you’re constantly trying to be better and better and better and better. I don’t know what so much clicked … I mean, I remember the moment when I went from dabbling in dieting to actually being just really truly disordered with it. I remember that moment really clearly. But it’s so funny because it doesn’t … I mean if you were to hear the story, you wouldn’t think that it was a super profound moment, you know?

Darrell Stern:
Well, who said it has to be? Who says that all of a sudden, Oh my God, you started whatever you just stopped eating. I don’t know. Maybe it was just something that kind of gradually … then all of a sudden it was there, it built up and then all of a sudden it was there. But it wasn’t like a big, huge emotional, big giant shift. It was just where you said, “Oh my God, I just don’t want to eat any more food”, and all that kind of stuff.

Arielle Shipe:
Yeah, I mean the moment was basically one of my friends and I had done this yoga challenge and we were in college, we were going to lose our last 10 pounds or five pounds or whatever it was at the time. We were like normal girls. We were probably pretty thin on most people’s standards, but we weren’t shredded or anything. We see all the [inaudible 00:06:26], all these yoga models and regular models. So we see that and we’re like, “Okay, we’re going to lose our last five pounds.” So we do this 60-day challenge. We went vegan. Unknowingly we were not eating nearly enough calories, but that wasn’t the point.

Darrell Stern:
Right.

Arielle Shipe:
I went home for a month back to Colorado. I was going to school out in Lake Tahoe and when I came back that month later, I had totally bounced back because I just got back into my old habits. And my friend was another 10 pounds thinner. For some reason instead of being concerned for her, you would think on a logical level and now I’m like, “Oh, my god, how was I not concerned?” I was jealous. I was in like, “Well, why am I not that thin?” So I was just like, “So what did you do?” And she’s like, “I’ve just been too depressed over this breakup to eat anything.” And for some reason that was the light bulb in my head that was like, “Oh, you just don’t eat anything. That’s how you do it.”

Darrell Stern:
Yeah. Wow. Yeah. I totally hear you. So how did that become something where it started to turn around and you realized, “Okay, great, I’m losing weight”, or, “Great, I’m even thinner”, but then when did that turn into, “I’m not healthy and I’m now all of a sudden realizing maybe I don’t have as much energy or I don’t have as much … or my mind is starting to get foggy”, or whatever it is. When and how did that realization come that, “Hey, maybe I’m getting a little bit too stern about this. Maybe I’m getting a little bit too …” Like, “Oh my gosh, I shouldn’t even … I got to keep on so much low intake”, and then all of a sudden you realize, “But wait a minute, I can’t do what I did before. I’m not having fun the way I had before.” How did that shift?

Arielle Shipe:
Yeah, I mean I think at some point there was this realization. It’s like, “Okay, well now I’m 25 pounds less, [inaudible 00:08:27] and I’m not happier.” It didn’t bring happiness. I think it’s hard when you’re in it because there is this layer of control and it is in some way this addiction, but there was [inaudible 00:08:45] of like, “Well, I’m still not happy here. So is this really the solution?” Anybody who’s been through some sort of … if I didn’t go to a treatment facility or anything like that. But in order to heal your metabolism and to heal your body, you have to gain … I gained 40 pounds. I had to go from being lighter than I’ve ever been too much heavier than I’ve ever been and that was the healthy reaction that my body had to take in order to recover and come back to neutral.

Arielle Shipe:
That period there, I mean, to get comfortable in your skin being 25 pounds or 20 pounds more than what you’ve been, that’s a big shift. You’re like, “Wow, I can love myself just as much here, probably more than I did when I was underweight.” So that’s kind of the big aha moment of like, “Okay, this is your starting point.” You know what I mean? Even though I have these goals and I have these things and I want to dream bigger, I’m not smaller because of where I am now. I’m happy of where I am now and I’m grateful for who I am now, I’m grateful for all of the things and I can still dream bigger without it being a space of deficiency. It’s not like I’m not good enough until [inaudible 00:10:01] I’m comfortable and confident here and I know that [inaudible 00:10:05].

Darrell Stern:
Right.

Arielle Shipe:
You know? [inaudible 00:10:07]

Darrell Stern:
I totally hear. [inaudible 00:10:11], I hear you’re saying that there’s an echo. I don’t know why. What I’ll do is I’ll probably try to mute myself because I don’t have the headphones on. That’s probably why. But we’ll try it. We’ll see if we can fix that. So I was about 223 pounds back before I was divorced and we ate a lot of meat and potatoes and sugar and whatever and I just floated up like a balloon. But before that, way before that in 2000, I was actually hospitalized. I had so much sugar in me and my sugar went up to 600, 800, 900 which is way above your blood sugar levels. They took me to the hospital. They had to cut my leg open and put an IV in. They couldn’t get anything in my arms and I couldn’t feel it, like literally.

Darrell Stern:
They put me on insulin right away. It dropped my blood sugar level down. The reason why people go blind with diabetes is that when your blood sugar drops fast, your eyes don’t, and that’s what starts to damage your eyes and all that. But then during my divorce, I … not deliberately. It wasn’t like, “I’m going to go on the divorce depression diet plan”, but I literally was just totally crazy, manic, smoking cigarettes like a fiend, didn’t eat very much at all and I dropped 20 something pounds over that. And although not the way to do it, you know what I’m saying, not the diet plan to do. I wouldn’t recommend that, but still, that was what jolted me so down that then I’ve been gradually … I’ve been under 200 pounds.

Darrell Stern:
That’s my like, “Oh, no.” I’ve gotten near it again, but that’s been my point of I’m never going to be that heavy again. But do you see … I don’t know what you want to call it, like a lack of equality in the way that people treat … even women treat other women in terms of weight and appearance. I’ll give you a funny example though. Back in the day when there was a king and there were peasants who were starving, the king was fat and gluttony and being fat was a sign that you were rich because you had food and you could eat whatever. You know what I’m saying. And blow up like, [inaudible 00:12:22] the big kings that were fat. So back in the day, hundreds of years ago, that was healthy, if that makes any sense. Right?

Darrell Stern:
As opposed to having hardly any food data. It’s kind of funny how everything flipped over and flipped upside down to where now thinner and thinner and thinner and thinner or whatever you want to call it is attractive. I’m very glad to see companies like Lane Bryant and other companies showing full-figured women and everyone’s beautiful and all that. But amongst women, is there … You know what I’m saying? A sense of inequality or anything in terms of that?

Arielle Shipe:
Yeah, I mean I think we would be lying if we said that people didn’t treat, especially women, didn’t treat each other based on their appearances. I think a lot of people want to say that they don’t because it was. When I was underweight, I got so many compliments. Everyone was like, “Oh, you look so great”. So that almost fuels that deficiency in your head. I think it’s flawed and I’m so grateful though that there seems to be this shift in the media for women like you were saying, showing all different body sizes and putting more of an emphasis on health than anything, health and wellness and everything. I’m so grateful to see that, but I think we’re still in the process of that shift. You know what I mean? It’s definitely not over. I think that if you ask anybody that’s really overweight that it is probably a lot harder to get jobs and things than it would be for somebody who wasn’t.

Darrell Stern:
Well, yeah, most definitely. Now, my mom was a school teacher from the early 70s all the way through the 90s before she came down with third stage of ovarian cancer that took her life way back in 2002. But she would tell me, she would say, “When I was growing up, a woman could be a teacher… ” What is it? A teacher, a secretary or something. There was one other one. Or a mom, and that was basically it. That was the only opportunity that there was in society. I was just watching the CNN special on Ruth Bader Ginsburg and what she did with all the equality in women’s rights and equality in the law. It was very interesting because the second case that she took in the 70s was a man whose wife died in childbirth and he went to collect social security and they told him, “No, because you’re not a single mom.”

Darrell Stern:
Right? And Ruth Bader Ginsburg said, “Hey, look. It goes both ways.” Right? If a man [inaudible 00:15:05] You know what I’m saying? That it goes both ways and it was brilliant what she did. I’m wondering in your generation now, as you grew up and the internet now being the ultimate leveling playing field and all the opportunities that women have, does that even cross your mind or were you just raised and you know, “Hey, I can be anything. I can do any career I want. All I have to do is go get it.” As a woman, you know?

Arielle Shipe:
Yeah. I mean I’m sure that there are people with different upbringings that would have different answers to that just because we’re all coming from different spaces. Personally, I have never doubted that whatever I wanted to do I could do. I still think that it is just like when men are a little bit more assertive, that that is kind of a respected quality. I think that when women hold that a lot of times they’ll be looked at as like, “Oh, she’s such a bitch,” or whatever. Sorry. I’m swearing.

Darrell Stern:
That’s fine. Oh, I’m from New Jersey. You can drop every bomb you want.

Arielle Shipe:
Okay, I swear a lot. [inaudible 00:16:09] Yeah. You know what I mean? So I think that there’s still some of that, having to sugarcoat it but I personally haven’t noticed that and I think that women … I mean, [inaudible 00:16:27] to bring everyone to a space of equality, [inaudible 00:16:38] human beings and we can stop really looking at somebody. Not looking at them if they’re a man or a woman or whether they identify as a man or identify as a woman or don’t identify with either, that we can just really start to look at people as people and as their human traits and qualities. I mean, so much of what’s going on in the media is exemplifying these types of things. So I think it is this uprising, but I definitely don’t think it’s [inaudible 00:17:05] yet. But I definitely didn’t feel [inaudible 00:17:06], I guess would be the answer to the question.

Darrell Stern:
Well, yeah, I mean we’re on our way. We’re a lot further along than we were before, and that’s a good thing. So I want to talk a little bit about shifting over into what you do in business. If you guys don’t know, if you go type in Arielle’s name into the Instagram, Arielle has amassed an astounding … What is it? 77,000? Somewhere in that area, right? Followers that are engaged with her on that social media platform. I just have to ask. Okay. When Instagram came out, right? Even when Facebook came out, I didn’t jump on it right away. I didn’t know what this was going to be. My generation, we were the web and websites and then e-commerce, web design and all that. That’s where I started my business 25 years ago.

Darrell Stern:
When you saw Instagram, right? When you looked at this at first, did you go, “Wow, I can share my life and engage with people”? Did it just naturally because of your age group and all … You know what I’m saying? Like just, “Wow, this is what this is for.” Or was it a discovery process for you too in terms of, “Wow, they’re liking this picture and I can message people?” You know what I’m saying? Did it just kind of come naturally to you or did you too have to go, “Okay, what is this? What do I do with this?”

Arielle Shipe:
Yeah, I mean when I was younger, I think it was high school, maybe late middle school, MySpace was the thing. So I had the MySpace account and I was really into it trying to get all the people. I learned whatever I could about code so I could have falling hearts and music playing in the background or whatever. So I did that. Then in high school, we had Facebook and I was definitely using it the way everyone was using it. In my later years of college, I was dating this climber guy. We were super outdoorsy and I was kind of anti social media. Or not anti it, but I wasn’t on it. So I had a Facebook but I wasn’t using it and so many of my friends had Instagram but I didn’t …

Arielle Shipe:
I actually got a notification just now because I have a certain number of followers are going to add all these features for people to see how long we’ve been on there. And it told me that I started my … literally just now, that I started my Instagram in April 2012 which was my senior year of college, which is much later than a lot of people who’ve been on there. But I still didn’t do anything with it. I didn’t look at it as an opportunity. My account was private for the first couple of years. To me, it was going to be the new Facebook, the new place to share pictures with my friends and family. I didn’t look at it like, “Oh my gosh, there’s going to be this huge opportunity that’s going to come.”

Darrell Stern:
Right. Super cool. So, okay, so now as this started to explode, right, you got up to a thousand, all of a sudden there’s two, all of a sudden there’s three, four, five, 10,000, on and on and on. Was that a little bit unnerving? Was it a little bit like, “Well gosh, now I guess I can’t just post whatever I want.” You know what I’m saying? For my friends. Did it start to become something of, “Wow, my image is out there and I need to start being concerned about that in a way.” I mean, there’s jokes now and TV commercials where the guy calls in sick from work.

Darrell Stern:
Actually, Saul Riceman, one of my clients, told me guy called in sick from work that he just hired, he goes on the guy’s Snapchat and he’s at home playing video games and he had to fire him. I mean, literally. So did that start to be a factor and then did that start to make you go back and start looking at your appearance again? Right? And your weight? You know what I’m saying? Did that start to almost go like, “Oh my gosh, maybe I’ve got to look at that issue again and what I look like on here”, or was it just like, “You know what, I’m in the mountains, I’m hiking. There’s what it is. Picture.”

Arielle Shipe:
Yeah. I mean, the universe likes to teach us lessons until we learn them, doesn’t it? So I can’t say it’s been as … Admittedly, it hasn’t been an overall smooth journey. I realized somewhere in there that … because I used to post a lot of different things. I’d post mountains and whatever, all the different things. And I realized that pictures of me did better than other ones. So I just started posting a little bit more pictures of me and if you follow me now it’s like all pictures that are all selfies, which is so funny. I mean, it’s not just me taking a beauty selfie. I’m out doing cool stuff so hopefully, there’s a little more layers but it’s so funny because I never intended it for it to be this wall of me, I guess you could say.

Arielle Shipe:
But yeah, I noticed what people were liking and what people weren’t liking or what wasn’t doing as well. So that’s how my themes crafted itself. It kind of reverse engineered itself. A lot of people are like, “This is my scene, this is what I want to put out there”, and then they put that out there. My theme created itself basically through trial and error, over the course of time realizing what people liked and what people didn’t like. It’s so funny that you asked this because I did a live feed last week. I had this big realization when I was out on this hike that I was feeling like I had to be something. So I wanted to do more like live feeds or YouTube or something like that to show more of myself so that people could get to know me as a person so that I didn’t feel like people have this image of me as these pristine, perfect pictures. They could really see the human behind it and maybe relate more.

Darrell Stern:
Awesome. Brilliant. So now, as you’re looking toward … Okay, so in there, mixed into there, there are these people that you young people call the haters, right? I and my New Jersey generation called them the fucking assholes. That’s what we call them back in Jersey. But that comes along, right? Somebody puts, “You’re ugly”, or B word something, whatever. I know in our conscious logical minds we go and just block it. Just block it, right? But at the same time, I know this from personal experience, it hurts. It stabs you, it hurts when someone is just for no random reason vicious and mean or even racist or chauvinistically or whatever the heck you want to call it. How have you dealt with that? Or have you noticed that hey, if you just honestly put your life out there, you’re not out there going hey, look at me. You’re having fun. You’re living in the spirit of your dream life revolution, hint hint, wink wink, that it just all came naturally and all that.

Arielle Shipe:
You know, I haven’t received a whole lot of hate, but I have received some things over the years. My social media started growing basically two springs ago. So a little over two and a half years. That’s when it went from 1000 to 2000 or whatever. In the beginning, it was funny because I’m a girl, I’m a kind of girlier looking girl and I was out doing rock climbing and things like that. So some of the early like hate was people saying that my gear was wrong and stuff like that, which wasn’t true. And they’re all men and it’s like there was slight insecurity.

Arielle Shipe:
Like, “Oh God, this woman.” I’m like, “It’s a different knot, and I learned it from a pro climber.” Whatever. So it was beyond the point. I see behind a lot of those comments though, that there’s hurt. So I’m really grateful for my yoga background because even though it still hurts at the moment, it does really help me pull back. When someone says something hurtful, I can say like, “Ouch”, but then I can also say like, “Okay, only hurt people hurt people.” Nobody’s going to go out and write mean comments if they’re feeling really good about themselves. So it allows me to move through that process a little bit faster. But yeah, no, they still don’t feel … I actually had a whole hater page once, I guess. There was one really bad one that ended up being blocked.

Arielle Shipe:
So they’re in there and it would be lying if I didn’t say they made some sort of … but I do feel that the process is zoom out and realize that only hurt people hurt people and most likely whatever they’re saying is a piece of their insecurity in themselves. So, say they were to call you cocky or whatever it might be. It’s likely that they’re lacking confidence in themselves and they’re [inaudible 00:26:10]. So, I know we all know this, but it’s really just applying that in the moment and having the wherewithal to not be your thoughts, to be able to zoom back.

Darrell Stern:
Okay. Super cool. So we just got two more questions. I know you got to run and you’re super busy taking over the universe and all that. Two questions are one, how do you get stern that in your personal relationships because with all these fans and followers and interactions in there, how do you separate out phone time, I call it, this time, social media time, from really having good relationships with friends, with family, and all that kind of stuff. Where do you set your boundaries there and then we’re going to talk just real quick about you joining the Stern Marketing Academy, which I still can’t believe and what our goals are with that. So where do you get stern in terms of when does this get enough with this, right? That’s there and I really want to spend quality time with my family and my friends.

Arielle Shipe:
Yeah, it’s definitely hard because my career has been built off of social media, so it’s not like I can … I don’t feel like I can completely disengage, but I have found ways to delegate things that I can delegate. Then I’ve always found …

Here’s a little Instagram hack for you guys if you want one. Basically, if you go out and you comment on a bunch of other pages when you do your post, you’re interacting on the platform. When you do your posts, your posts will get higher boosts and you want to respond to all the comments you get within the first 30, 45 minutes as quickly as possible.

So what I’ve done is kind of time blocked. I’m like, I know.

Darrell Stern:
Response to comment within 45 minutes. Okay, hold on. Yes, go ahead.

Arielle Shipe:
So I know that okay, if I’m going to do a post at six o’clock that probably from 5:55 to 6:30, 6:45 I’m going to need to have my phone on me. But once I get past that threshold, I just let it go and then I come back at another time. So I time block and I make sure that I make time for it, but I don’t let it take over my life. That’s something I’ve had to learn and you ebb and flow with addiction to it. I try not to turn my phone on before 08:00 or 9:00 AM. I wake up and do my stuff. So you just have to create personal rules around it and it’s so important not just for your relationships but for your mental health too. So it’s all around.

Darrell Stern:
Super cool. So we met because I saw what you’re doing on Instagram and we talked about you starting a YouTube channel and also refining this a little bit in terms of the business negotiations that you’re going to make with other brands that want to work with you. Then we talked about the programs that you might start, we don’t know exactly what those are yet and all those kinds of things. So I’m thrilled to be working with you on that and on taking this influence and now doing more things with it. When we say this word because is the hottest term now, influencer. I’m going to ask you a flat out question, do you feel you have influence over these people? You know what I mean? I say that you do. I think that what comes into that is then sales and negotiation, business skills and the next step in terms of making that into a more monetary business. But do you feel that? Do you feel like if I said these people would do that? Like do you feel that influence that you have over people or not really at all?

Arielle Shipe:
I mean, sometimes. I mean, intellectually, I guess sometimes yes. I’ve been able to build part of my business knowing that if I reach out and I do certain things and I know I have an audience. So to me, I feel less like I have influence over people and more like I just have an audience to speak to and I still actually am somewhat uncomfortable with the word influencer and fans and stuff like that because I’m just like … I don’t know. To me, I’m just a person and even though I have a lot of followers and I’ve gotten a lot of really cool opportunities from it, it hasn’t affected my regular life so much. I still have a fairly regular person life and maybe I don’t see it from that because I kind of extract all these extraordinary opportunities that I’ve gotten to do. But I still feel like a normal person and so I don’t know. I don’t know if that answers your question at all, but it’s very … I acknowledge I have an audience. The influence part I’m still unsure about.

Darrell Stern:
Coming to terms or grasping what that would be. No, that’s super cool. So I want to give you guys a little bit of behind the scenes into what Arielle … Literally, we met at an event for Juice Plus. We talked about this, I just talked to her earlier today. We said yes, let’s work on this together. Then I said, “Hey, I’m doing this show.” So this is literally our first business meeting right into this. But I want to show you, let’s see if I can do it. If I can make … Hold on. How do I do it? Oh, here. Okay. So you can see this a little bit. So this is the mind map and I can actually zoom in on it, I think, of what we started to work on. Oh wait, look at that. I can zoom in that. For Arielle.

Darrell Stern:
This is part of the Stern Storming process where we have looked at, okay, she likes outdoors and she has an outdoor lifestyle. Yoga, nutrition. And then her mantra, which is this dream revolution life. And then what we’re doing is we’re actually breaking things down into what will be the subjects that she will do her YouTube videos on that are then going to become gosh knows what else other opportunities that will come up. Online courses, programs, all that other kind of stuff. So I think you’re a real, real, real good example, Arielle, of someone who has really embraced life to the fullest. Someone who has shown that … We were talking about this earlier. “Hey, I can go take a picture of myself and I have some acne on my face and Hey, I’m out in the mountains and it’s beautiful Colorado and I’m not really …” You know what I’m saying?

Darrell Stern:
You’ve come through that journey of self-worth and security and who you are and what you have to say and you know what you have to say to the world. I’m just thrilled because you know me, I’m just an amplifier and a promoter and engineer behind the scenes to say this is what you want to do, let’s make it work. So I couldn’t be more honored and happy to be working with you. And I’m going to be … I mean I’m taking notes. Go on it at 45 minutes after Instagram and I’ve gathered … One more thing. So what you’re saying is, and I noticed this, Instagram goes live and it’s hot and that’s the next half hour is when people react and then if you react to those reactions, right, that’s what captures that moment? Right?

Arielle Shipe:
Yeah. I mean here’s the thing. Right now, yes. It seems to be ever evolving and I try not to get too attached, but it seems right now that that’s a really helpful way to use it. I think what I’m sensing from a lot of these social media platforms right now is they want to … it’s like tit for tat. They want to reward you with more engagement when you’re out engaging. They want it to be reciprocal versus, “Well, here’s me doing my stuff. Okay, bye.” They want to reward people who are using the platform the way they want people to use it if that makes sense.

Darrell Stern:
Well, yeah, most definitely, and we can get into this in another whole lesson because Arielle is now in the Stern Marketing Academy. She’ll be joining me on some webinars. I hope you’ll come along and teach some of our other students some things and then they’ll have some things in order to talk to you about and all those different kinds of adventures that we’re going to have. So thank you very much for getting stern with me. This is super fun. I’m so excited to be working with you and collaborating with you and all that. I mean, I always say celebrate your successes and it’s okay to toot your own horn because you have come a long way, a remarkable long way, not just for someone your age, not just for a woman your age or anything like that.

Darrell Stern:
But just as a person who’s just had … who’s really understood the importance of self personal development, because usually, that’s something that that takes a long time for people to finally be able to see themselves and self analyze and all that. So you’re absolutely brilliant. Can’t get enough of you, can’t get enough of the work that we’re going to do together, Arielle, and thank you so much for taking the time out of your busy schedule to join me here on The Other Stern Show.

Arielle Shipe:
Yeah, thank you very much. Talk to you soon.

Darrell Stern:
All right, super cool, guys. We’ll be back next week and I wanted to thank Arielle again for joining us. Next week towards the end of the week, I’m going to LA, the 29th and 30th. I will be at the big Outlier Podcast Festival in LA. I’m going to be up on stage emceeing some of it. I’m going to be on a panel on Sunday. That will all be live stream so I’ll bring you guys up to date with all that and hey, I got a little Instagram. I’m getting there, but we’re all learning and we all can learn from each other. And I’m just so happy to be working with Arielle now and all of that. So thank you very much, guys.

Remember, set your boundaries, get stern, define who you are and live that life that you can have in a true revolution of your own self.

Darrell Stern:
The Other Stern Show is proudly sponsored by the Stern Marketing Academy. Grow your profit, grow your influence, earn your degree in everything you need to do to do your digital marketing rights.

Schedule some time to be ON this show with

Darrell Stern
https://calendly.com/sternstorming

Join me in my $7 a month mastermind group:
https://www.sternmarketingacademy.com/courses/sevenpermonthlasttime

Get the FREE Stern Marketing Academy App on:
Apple:
https://apps.apple.com/us/app/stern-marketing-academy/id1484666940
And Google Play:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=co.appbros.sternmarketingacademy&hl=en_US
Connect with the Other Stern Show on Instagram at:
https://www.instagram.com/othersternshow/