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Darrell Stern:
To really succeed. You’ve got to get stern and we’re going to talk to all of our amazing guests about how they do just that. This is Darrell Stern live from Denver, Colorado with The Other Stern Show.

Darrell Stern:
Hey, this is Darrell Stern and welcome to season two, episode one of the amazing Other Stern Show and it has been quite an adventure over the past a year and a half bringing this podcast to life. And we are over here. I am planning, I’m bringing you a lot more episode in 2019 and going into 2020 as we search for the way to live in balance in our lives and in our business and figuring out where we can get stern, where we can set those boundaries that really allow us to have that true spiritual and emotional and business success that we’re striving for.

Darrell Stern:
Meaning that in our hearts and our souls we just at a state of ease and balance and not feeling stress and overwhelm and all those other things. So my first guest here for season two is an amazing woman. She has been through a lot of hardships in her life, but she has also had some amazing business, success stories. I’m telling you, if you want to talk to an amazing young lady here who can really tell you how, look you can’t do it all.

Darrell Stern:
You’ve got to delegate. You’ve got to make contracts. You’ve got to have people you’re going to hear the story. It’s amazing. Like Tamara Linnan has made herself into an amazing business executive. I’m going to bring her on with me right now and say hello to everybody. Welcome to the Stern.

Tamara Linnan:
Thank you so much. And it is Linnan.

Darrell Stern:
Linnan, okay, so wait, hold on. Hey, Darrell Stern here and welcome to Linnan. Okay, Tamara.

Tamara Linnan:
Linnan.

Darrell Stern:
I got it right. Linnan. Okay, so I’m going to bring somebody amazing onto the show right now. She is an amazing business executive. You want to learn how to really like to get stern about having business contracts and having a business run itself in the background of your life. This woman is extraordinary. Please welcome to the show Tamara Linnan.

Tamara Linnan:
Thanks for having me, Darrell. I appreciate it. It’s an honor to speak with you today.

Darrell Stern:
Awesome. So let’s go back before the business and the struggles and all those things that we’ve had to deal with in this box that we got at the beginning of their lives called our lives. And go back to when you were young and when you were learning things from your parents and from your teachers and tell me a little bit about what the main lesson bar that you learned at a young age that became like the escape rolls of you. Like I believe this and I never do that. What are some of the main lessons that you learned early on in life?

Tamara Linnan:
Well, I grew in a very small town in Pennsylvania of about 1200 people. So everybody knew everybody. I graduated with about 50 kids. And so I think the biggest lesson I’ve learned in that small town as distance distances, we were from other people. And you have that, “small-town mentality.” I think the foundation for how I run my business in life truly came from that.

Tamara Linnan:
Because when you’re in a small town like that, you can’t screw people over. You have to keep your word because you might not be able to shop at a store because your great, great, great, great, great grandfather screwed over that person 125 years ago. And so I really just learned that foundation of integrity, my handshake and my word mean everything.

Tamara Linnan:
And that you truly do need to treat others the way you wish to be treated so that you don’t kind of bury yourself. And I think out in the larger part of the world, business has gotten away from that key foundation of just always trying to do the right thing.

Darrell Stern:
Always trying to do the right thing. Yeah. My parents drilled into me the golden rule, do unto others as you would have done unto yourself. And yet I can say out loud that there’s been times when, yeah, I’ve been mean to someone. Yeah. I’ve lashed out. And I really didn’t see at the time anger taking control of things and regrets and hurts and things.

Darrell Stern:
Even though we know that rule, we then look at and say, “Well gosh how did I fall off that?” So where have been times when that integrity and that rule has kind of fallen off base because I know on a personal level you have said some health issues, which is probably the most stressful thing that you can deal within your life as your own mortality.

Darrell Stern:
It’s like, well great. I have a business or I this and that is good. Why the heck is the karma of the universe giving me this to deal with on top of it? So how have you taken that integrity and try to hold onto it through all of the things that you’ve had to deal with?

Tamara Linnan:
Oh, that’s a very good question. And you’re right, we’re all human. I’ve lost integrity. I’ve screw people over without kind of really realizing that the time that I was doing it. So for me, quite honestly, it’s all about the people that surround me or the people that don’t surround me.

Tamara Linnan:
I try to keep… And I do, I have a core group of friends that don’t have a problem telling me when I’m going to stray from my own ethics and where I want to go. And regardless if I get upset with them or not, they’re going to stand up to me and say, “This is not what you’re about. What’s going on with the justifier.”

Tamara Linnan:
And so for me, honestly I can’t take a lot of credit for maintaining that on my own. Because we all waver for me, what they say is true. You’re the equivalent of the top five people that you spend the most time with. So you really need to make sure that the people and the environment that you’re in, it matches up with where you want to go and what your integrity level is.

Darrell Stern:
Amazing. That’s so true too. It’s kind of like, well these people or these things and all of this is pulling me down and somehow and as politer away as possible. You have to close some doors. You have to get stern on the boundaries where you set up, I’m going to have these people in my life they’re supportive and they’re also a model for how I want my life to be.

Darrell Stern:
Whereas these other people are totally disrupting that and I don’t want these disruptions anymore. So where at what point in your life do you have, you had to get stern and say, “Okay, look I can’t be associated with this person or that business or whatever anymore.”

Darrell Stern:
Like how have you been able to mold your life around I want to be around and surrounded by these people that are… they are up there on the highway, they’re at exit 56 and I’m at exit five and I’m zooming along behind them. Like I’m there, I’m on track with you guys.

Tamara Linnan:
Oh, good, great questions this morning. I should have my coffee before I jumped on here. No, that’s a great, great question. And it’s difficult. It’s not always easy to tell somebody you’re not a good fit for me, especially if they want to pay you as a client or something like that. But I’ve just, maybe it’s the old fashioned value in me, cowboy boots the kind of the whole cowgirl integrity thing that there’s the old saying, if you stand for nothing, you’ll fall for everything.

Tamara Linnan:
And I have just learned the hard way over the years that me wavering in the things that are important to me does nothing but damage. Yes, it’s costing me a little bit of money, but every single time I have wavered and made an exception for something that goes against my key goal or really my ethics and morals for how my business should be run at the end of the day has just backfired horribly and just wasn’t worth the headache of dealing with that.

Tamara Linnan:
And here’s the biggest mistake I find people might and I did myself and it’s something that I’ve kind of learned really recently as I struggle with my health, is that a lot of people think that getting rid of other people has to be like this hostile, what you’re bad for me, get out of my life. And you have to have some sort of major blow up in anger to ridge yourself with people in situations that might not be the best for you.

Tamara Linnan:
And I’m slowly learning that you don’t have to have those major angry breakups. You don’t have to burn bridges. You just have to become super unavailable in a polite way and just really focus and just start slowly making less time for them or not picking up every phone call. And at the end of the day, if somebody is throwing toxicity your way, you don’t have to accept it.

Tamara Linnan:
There’s the story and I don’t remember who told it. Where if somebody’s holding a bag of trash in their hand and there are maggots coming out of it and it’s a horrible smell and they try to hand it to you, are you going to take that from them? Well, most people will say, “No, why would I? You can see the magnitude and see just why would I take that from that person.”

Tamara Linnan:
And that’s how I try to approach life in that just because somebody’s thrown anger at me or toxicity at me doesn’t mean I have to take it from them. I don’t have to take that emotion on. So that’s been the biggest factor for me is learning to just in a friendly way to allow people that aren’t good for me to have less access to my life.

Tamara Linnan:
And eventually, they’ll change and they get access again or they just kind of slowly just kind of ends in it. It’s not a hostile situation, which was what most of us create for ourselves when we’re trying to change our inner circle and change what it is we’re doing. Not everything has to be a big dramatic exit if that makes sense.

Darrell Stern:
Yeah, it does. It makes a lot of sense. So let’s tell people about it a little bit about what you do. I mean, you are a live streaming champion with The Starving Dog, but you’ve also told me this, right in our discussions because we’re good friends. You told me you have in the background of your life, like an entire business it just runs itself, which us being solo entrepreneurs and all that.

Darrell Stern:
We have a hard time releasing control over what we’re doing or we’re sitting here saying, “Yeah, I could kind of teach other people to help me. But having the whole business run itself in the back, where you don’t even have to do anything this just seems unfathomable to most of us. So tell us about what you do, your business structures and all these things that you’ve got going in life.

Darrell Stern:
And I really want to talk to you about like how you get stern and how you were able to outsource the main parts of your other businesses and how you were to keep them going with customer service and all these kinds of things in the background literally of your life.

Tamara Linnan:
Well, thanks. As business owners, we’re all control freaks and so I’ve made the mistakes and not delegating so my first business is a virtual assistant business. It’s an answering service as well but I hate that word because it’s got a negative connotation.

Tamara Linnan:
So our front office solutions, we actually come into a business and we answer their phone calls, we’ll do their dispatching. We’ll run their insurance. We run their front office just the same way you would expect an hourly employee to do so. So that allows us to give that customer service level standard. For small business owners who can’t answer the phone all the time or the level of service, their hourly employees go up and down.

Tamara Linnan:
So I was out there again, kind of doing the wrong thing. I was convincing my clients that they needed to let go of control and let us help them. It couldn’t do everything themselves, but I wasn’t doing that for my own business at the time and I’ve actually, believe it or not, ran my answering service straight into the ground twice in the last 11 years, but then got it back up when I started doing the things I was telling my clients to do and so the first thing is you have to give your employees and the people around you the authority to problem solve.

Tamara Linnan:
If you have somebody there that has to run to you and have you make a decision because you don’t trust, they’ll make the decision. It’s the same thing as you still maintaining that control and people that are working for you that feel like you don’t trust them, aren’t going to level up. They aren’t going to take time to learn how to have pride in their work to help you.

Tamara Linnan:
At the end of the day, these are individuals that are helping you build your dream and they’re on the front line. They’re people picking up the phones, they’re the people maintaining your customer service. And you have to give them the authority to make decisions. But with that comes really, honestly, most business owners go out there and they start a business before they know what their standard operating procedure should be.

Tamara Linnan:
They start a bit they say, “Well, I don’t have enough customers to worry about customer service now. I don’t have an employee yet. Why do I need a job description?” And that’s where most business owners fail. Most business owners do not go out of business within the first two years from lack of business. It comes from growing too quickly.

Tamara Linnan:
And then them not having that foundation in place to keep up. And then it just kept crashes and burns. And so it’s not because their business plan was horrible, it’s because they didn’t understand the structure from which they wanted to build. So for us, it was making sure before I ever hired my first employee I had a job description. You sat down with them, you told them exactly what they would be doing.

Tamara Linnan:
What your value is in customer service, for example, you’re going to answer a work order that comes in via the email within 30 minutes, that’s my company standard. They have to understand what those things are. If there’s clear communication and they truly understand what your expectations are they’re going to rise to meet that and go above it.

Tamara Linnan:
And it wasn’t until I started doing those things and having trust in the people that are hired and they’re going to make mistakes. That is okay. Hell, I’m the business owner, I’ve made a ton of mistakes well my business myself. So I look at why they made that decision and if it was a poor one then it’s a learning opportunity and that’s kind of how now my answering service and my own team business as well how to run themselves because I have to from the get-go, not handle the client myself, step back and let the people that I hired to do their job, do their job.

Tamara Linnan:
Micromanagement is a bad, bad thing. And too many business owners think nobody can do it as good as they can or they can’t learn. And that’s just not true. I will tell you, I have several employees who do things way better than I could do myself. And that’s another thing, making sure you hire people who do things you’re horrible at.

Tamara Linnan:
There’s no sense and hiring people who do the same thing you do because then the, but really other important things kind of fall through the cracks and making sure that you can’t step on each other’s toes. So I have employees who do computer software stuff. I have no clue how we do it, but they do an amazing job and they get the final say in that department because they do it better than I do. And I have to recognize that my business and my clients need things that I can’t provide by myself.

Darrell Stern:
So you are a veteran and first of all thank you for doing what you’ve done to serve our country and to keep us all free. So my next question to you is from being in the military, what parts of that training turned over into what you’re talking about now in terms of running a business and making job descriptions and trusting other people?

Darrell Stern:
Because I know in the military that the people need to have trust 100% trust in each other to work together on a military mission. I mean there must be trust. And it sounds to me a lot like you are establishing great trust in the people that work for you. You’re literally saying, “I don’t even know what they do, but I trust them and I know that they are doing the job they’re supposed to do and they even know more than me about it.”

Darrell Stern:
So what aspects of trust and other things from the military side of your life floated into and became staples in your business life and your personal life?

Tamara Linnan:
Almost any part I think of military training where you have to depend on a team carries over into business. I worked in the medical field, I was a hospital corpsman in the military and the people around me were counting on me to start the IV or help them medically and get them to that next space. And with that, I had to trust that my fellow corpsman was there to help and they were going to step up and do the right thing.

Tamara Linnan:
And so I think you just, one of the key things, like I said with the military is everybody understands their role. The first thing they do is teach you if you come up on a scene for example, and somebody is bleeding you’re going in to help them, you need to stop the bleeding. So the first thing you do is look around and see if someone’s there.

Tamara Linnan:
You put to that person and you say dial nine one one, boom. And you know what I mean? And you kind of make sure everybody knows their roles and so that person can get help faster. And that’s kind of where I had to learn with delegating those roles. And I just wanted to clarify, I know exactly what my employee’s job is just because they don’t understand the technology behind it or how they do it.

Tamara Linnan:
Doesn’t mean I don’t understand or I’m not aware of what their job description is because I certainly am. I just know that on a technical level, I don’t understand their brain. I wish my brain worked that way, but it doesn’t. So again, it just comes down to that delegation of this is what I hired you to do. You’re an expert in this field.

Tamara Linnan:
And basically I think it was TD Jakes who said this basically you have to tell folks [inaudible 00:19:09] the deck, I heard you as an expert the day I know more about your job than you do is the day you get fired. Because you want to be around people who are growing and staying a step ahead of you so that you can be successful and your business, can grow and when your business grows you can pay your employees more and affect more lives.

Tamara Linnan:
And so it’s just also besides that trust is being around people who do continuing education. You continue to grow or you don’t want a paramedic coming up on the scene who hasn’t taken a new CPR class since 1935. You just don’t want that. You want people keeping their skills and their industry up to date fresh and always striving to learn new things.

Darrell Stern:
That’s amazing. As soon as when you’re done talking, I don’t know why you bang on something. You’re like damn like boom. Okay. So I want to talk about now and go into the nonprofit aspect of your life. And I’m going to read from the about section of your Starving Dog web page. And also your Facebook page.

Darrell Stern:
If you want to follow an amazing movement that actually is helping veterans, then please do take a look at Starving Dog. And it says on here it says, nobody should face the darkness alone. Suicide is an extremely severe side effect of depression. Those that choose to take their own lives to end up in darkness, they simply cannot shake.

Darrell Stern:
On average 121 people commit suicide in the United States. Our mission is to lead as many people out of the darkness as we can. So what has been your experience personally in this darkness? I will readily admit that yes, I have had episode times in my life where I said, “You know what? Let’s just throw in the towel, jump off a bridge, take a pile of pills, like it can’t get… There’s no way out of this.”

Darrell Stern:
And then of course as long I, one of my mottoes is just stick around for a while longer and I’m sure things will change and they always do. And we’ve had lots of discussions about that. But tell us about the development of The Starving Dog and your mission to help veterans with this darkness that they feel from all kinds of, I know there are all kinds of different things. There’s PTSD, there are all kinds of different issues that happen with our veterans and what you were movement is doing about that to help this.

Tamara Linnan:
Thank you. Also, this movement is very personal to me beyond the veteran aspect. Yes, I happen to be a veteran and there’s a ton of veterans that commit suicide in this country each and every day. But you have 22 veterans a day take their life. But so do between 16 and 17 youth from the ages of 10 to 24 also take their life each and every, every single day in this country.

Tamara Linnan:
My mother committed suicide when I was nine years old and it was a really difficult thing to navigate and truly didn’t understand that at that age especially in a very small town. And the fact that at the time, well I’m still Catholic being told that my mother was in hell and that she was weak-minded. I mean I was raised to be ashamed of my mother and her legacy because she was a weak-minded person who abandoned her husband and children.

Tamara Linnan:
And it took a lot of years for me to realize I’m, the [inaudible 00:22:46] that just wasn’t the case. I was raised with this shame. I was a teen cutter because I felt like I couldn’t grieve, I couldn’t communicate because again, I came from a town where psychology was a pseudoscience to these folks. You’re just weak-minded and all that.

Tamara Linnan:
And yeah, I got to the point where with the struggles that I’ve had with my health and other things in life, I was suicidal myself. I became really close to doing the same thing to my children that my mother did to us. And so at that point, I decided that I was going to start to seek out, truly understand or try to attempt to understand my mother’s side of her story of why she got to that point.

Tamara Linnan:
And my degree is in psychology. I’m finishing up my masters now to actually have a counseling license. Now I’m not going to become a counselor, but I want to make sure I understand how this disease works so I can help as many people as possible. So The Starving Dog and so as I encourage people to go to the page and watch the video and it looks plain. It’s just a quick two-minute video of what exactly we mean by The Starving Dog.

Tamara Linnan:
And so what we do, so I’ve created a community of entrepreneurs where we put action where our hashtag is. And so what that means is whatever you’re passionate about we encourage you to get out into the community, do something about it. If you’re a hashtag me to person, that’s great, you’re hashtagging that. But are you down working with rape victims? No. For me it’s #mentalhealthawareness.

Tamara Linnan:
And I have to go, okay, am I doing more than just telling other people that this situation needs to change or am I trying to change it? And so we bring that together. We pay for mental health services for veterans, teen cutters and their families. But also recognize the fact that just sending somebody to counseling the depressed person, doesn’t fix the situation.

Tamara Linnan:
There’s something in their environment that doesn’t work for them. So what I’ve done is I’ve gathered a group of entrepreneurs and we have amazing people as part of The Starving Dog action pack just the name a few. I’m one, I have Les Brown Jr. who has joined. And we’ve had amazing people Frank Shankwitz from Make-A-Wish she’s been on our show for Touch Base Tuesday where we talk about the check on your loved ones.

Tamara Linnan:
On our live show and it’s just a group of entrepreneurs that I’ll do very separate things, but they are actually out in the community making a difference. We work with other nonprofits so that we can get more people resources. So most nonprofits have a specific agenda. Hey, we’re here to make sure people aren’t homeless or us. We’re here to make sure people aren’t committing suicide.

Tamara Linnan:
We’re here to make sure people understand those finances. Those are all very separate nonprofits. But really at the end of the day, single-minded nonprofits don’t help anybody. They help with that one issue and then six months later that person usually is right back in the position you felt you got them out of because you didn’t fix their entire environment.

Tamara Linnan:
And so we’re just, we’re bringing together other nonprofits where we work together with them or providing the mental health services. They’re going to put the roof over their head, they’re going to get them to resume services and things like that. And so really that’s kind of what the movement is about. Why I do it was to change my mother’s legacy of mental health.

Tamara Linnan:
Now, I used to think that I needed to change the legacy of suicide in my family. I’ve lost several family members actually to suicide besides my mother. But that was not the way to look at it. I have realized that truly change my family’s legacy, we have to change the stigma and the legacy of the way my family viewed mental health issues and not being ashamed of them.

Tamara Linnan:
And actually speaking about the elephant in the room and a family line where many of my family members are bipolar, have some sort of mental illness that gets passed down from generation to generation. And instead of trying to fix that legacy of not making sure another family member commit suicide. I’m trying to change the legacy that not another family member is ashamed or we’ll go get help for their mindset.

Darrell Stern:
Well, I wanted to pause a moment and give you some gracing, give you some and give you some gratitude because you are living a very full life. What I mean by that is that you have taken all these different aspects of your life and not only are you obviously running businesses and all these other things, but you’re also taking on a mission that is helping people and also taking something that is deep-rooted in your family and in your life and turning that around and doing something with it that is so magnificent and so powerful and fulfilling.

Darrell Stern:
So be fulfilled is what I’m saying it’s okay to say, “You know what I’m really happy that I am fulfilling my life here with a mission to help people. And I’ve turned around something that could have been the end of me and the obviously it was the end of some of your family and made it into something beautiful and positive.

Darrell Stern:
So I just wanted to really take a breath here and compliment you on that and allow you the space to relish in that because that is absolutely incredible and amazing. And I think that too with the darkness and losing people to it, that when finally as we get older we realize that our parents are just people that are older than us at the time.

Darrell Stern:
You know what I mean? Like as we approach the age that our parents were like, now I’m 47 I know exactly how old I was when my mom was 47 and where she was in her life and what was going on. And it changes the whole perspective on that. So I want to conclude our episode here, which is just extraordinary and will allow, of course, you’re going to tell all about where to find all these things online and all that too.

Darrell Stern:
But how do you get stern now in terms of keeping in teams, of making sure that you’re staying on the light side, right? And obviously do you allow yourself still to grieve, to pause, to reflect and but how do you stern in that in terms of balancing that out so that you yourself don’t pull back into the dark side of all of this?

Tamara Linnan:
I, again, I pay very close attention to the folks that I have around me. I’m very blessed where if I start to have too much on my plate or my health is failing again, to have people call, check on me, “Hey, are you okay? How can I help you?” And I realized that is my responsibility to toe the line for practicing what I preach and making sure that I do stop and reflect.

Tamara Linnan:
I block off on my calendar an hour every single day where I can meditate or pray or whatever it is I need to do that day and do a self-inventory of, okay, are you still on the path where you need to go? You need to get to back to counseling or whatever it is to make sure that I stay leveled. Because it is a very hard thing to balance, business and family and health and everything and it can become extremely overwhelming.

Tamara Linnan:
So for me, it’s just a matter of just being authentic and when my friends check on me I say I can’t do this another single. I’m involved and lots of veterans groups online and things. Or I can go in and say, “I’m having, Hey guys, just, I’m not seeing the vision. I’m not seeing the change I’m making and leaning on that support system.

Tamara Linnan:
I have an amazing fellow veteran, Sean B Laurie, who will call and check on me when he notices I’m not on Facebook a lot or I stop posting or I’m just not kind of responding and he’s immediately calling going,

“Okay, stop, reflect and take some me time.” The biggest mistake most of us make in our lives is putting other people first all the time.

Tamara Linnan:
And if falling apart, I can’t help people. So if I can’t keep it together. So for me, it’s a must. It’s not how you do it. To me, it’s something I have to do. It would be, I feel very selfish of me to fall apart completely. You can get lost in that darkness. And possibly lose thousands of other people’s lives because I didn’t do the right thing and take care of myself first.

Tamara Linnan:
And so that I can continue to help other people. Then again, it comes out to delegation. There’s been a couple of times you’ve taken over co-host for me Tucker, there’s a couple of times where I just needed a break and touch, misuse it needs to get done. But I’m just having an emotional day.

Tamara Linnan:
I can’t do it. I’m very blessed to have folks who see the vision that I have, who step up and help me. So the biggest thing is to ask for help. Tell people where you’re at. And there’s a difference between whining and feeling sorry for yourself and complaining to people about the depression you’re in and just telling somebody, “You know what, hey, I’m having a rough day. I need your help today. Here’s how you can help.”

Tamara Linnan:
Nine times out of 10, that person will step up and do that for you. Also, again, I’m telling you, it comes down to the environment, environment, environment. If you’re only hanging out with a bunch of depressed people who are suicidal, it’s just, you guys weren’t going to pull each other out of the light. And so I tried to surround myself with positivity as much as I can.

Tamara Linnan:
I only watch or listen to inspirational or motivational or uplifting podcasts or videos. I don’t watch documentaries that are depressing. I make sure that I’m, that I keep depressing things as far away from my environment as humanly possible and I don’t listen to those sad songs or look at those stories of despair where people didn’t make it.

Tamara Linnan:
And just do the best I can to keep my area with as many flashlights as possible on and not allow the darkness to kind of creep in and take over because it moves fast and it’s really good at convincing you that you can’t get out of it. And so I try never turn the light off if that makes sense.

Darrell Stern:
There were so many value bombs in what you just said. There are at least 10 to 20 different things. I love how what the message that you were having of, there’s no shame in this. There’s no shame in saying, “Hey, I need help. Guys someone here, I need this done today, I can’t do it right now.” And there’s no shame in that at all.

Darrell Stern:
And the buildup that you have also experienced in terms of having a tamer and you are having people around you that are ready to lend a hand because you are so you have given way more than enough to do that obviously, but at the same time, the underlying message of your entire mission being that mental illness should not be shamed. It should not be an embarrassment. And at the same time, there is a way to talk about it. There is a way to ask for help.

Darrell Stern:
So I love all that. So in terms of meditation and diet and food and keeping yourself as healthy as you can. How do you get stern in those areas in terms of how you take care of yourself?

Tamara Linnan:
Well, it comes down to, at the end of the day, taking full responsibility. We’re 100% responsible for our environment. And again, with my health, my food is no choice. So I have a lot of Ivy nutrition and things like that, that I have to do. And so I just, I don’t have a choice in that realm.

Tamara Linnan:
But again, it’s getting that stern sense of this is not an option to eat poorly. Because then I’m going to feel poorly and I’m going to fall down. And really at the end of the day, if you’re upfront with people and you tell them this is a line that can’t be crossed, they’ll respect that and they’ll back off.

Tamara Linnan:
But it’s about the full responsibility that at the end of the day Tamara’s responsible for Tamara’s healthfully. Yes, I have doctors and things, but if I don’t listen to them, right, I’m not going to get to where I want to go. And so it’s just having that mindset of doing this is not an option. And you have to tell yourself, yeah that pizza would taste so good right now, but I love you too much to let you eat that because tomorrow you’re going to feel horrible.

Tamara Linnan:
And it’s about self-love and self-appreciation. And again, putting yourself first and saying, “Why are you… You want other people to treat you great, right? We all want people to treat us great. But why would you not then for yourself great. And treat your self the way that you would want your children or your friends to feel.

Tamara Linnan:
And so for me, it’s just they’re deal-breakers. I tell myself I must, and a little trick I use, and it sounds corny, but anywhere you go on my house, you’ll just see these random index cards or things on the wall that will say, “Did you take care of you today? I do not quit. Your health is important.” And so again, the environment.

Tamara Linnan:
I surround myself with those little reminders I have them it sounds silly in my vehicle. I have like my debit card wrapped in one of these index cards. And so if you go to like a fast food place, I have to open up this index card that says, “Is this what’s best for you?” Before I can use that debit card at McDonald’s.

Darrell Stern:
Okay, I need to get our index cards and a rubber band to put around my debit card, like immediately. That is amazing to actually have around your environment, in your car, in your place where you work, in your home, these reminder cards all over the place, “Hey, let’s stay on the course here and all of that.” So as you’ve risen up let’s call it popularity or near mission. And more and more people are connected to you and all that.

Darrell Stern:
How do you get stern in your personal relationships and your business relationships? So you’re making sure that the people that are in your tribe or in your tribe and those that don’t belong there for whatever reason or let go. Where do you set your boundaries in terms of who you let in and who you have to Unfortunately or fortunately whatever the case may be said, “Okay, well thank you very much but no thanks.”

Tamara Linnan:
Again that’s understanding what your mission is. So I’m very upfront, we tell entrepreneurs, okay, if you’re going to be part of The Starving Dog action pack team and if you’re going to be somebody that joins this group with us, which by the way, it doesn’t cost anything. We’re not trying to sell anything. If you want me associated with this group, that means you’re an entrepreneur that provides the products promised at the price promise.

Tamara Linnan:
You provide that with integrity and you take action. You’re giving back to your community in some way when the cameras aren’t rolling. Are you down at the food bank? What are you doing? And every entrepreneur that works with us, most of the time he’s coming out of pocket. They’re taking their own money and they’re going out in the community to help others.

Tamara Linnan:
So again, it’s just that transparency of here’s what we’re about and if you cannot do these things or if you join us and you stop doing these things, then you’re out kind of thing. And it’s not a harsh thing. It’s just we, I want to make sure that when I refer people to my entrepreneur friends or I tell folks, “Hey if you hire this person, they’re going to go above and beyond for you.”

Tamara Linnan:
That’s exactly what is happening. I am not willing to burn bridges with people I care about for someone who doesn’t want to take action and hold themselves accountable, which also helps hold me accountable. When you’re surrounded by a group of individuals like this would that take action and self-development and these things are really important.

Tamara Linnan:
You have to keep up with them in a way. And it’s not keeping up with the Joneses in the terms of go out and buy a car you don’t need in, can’t afford. It’s in terms of keeping up with people that have integrity and people that aren’t going to stop providing value to their community or stop growing just because you’re no longer growing. They’ll leave you behind very quickly.

Tamara Linnan:
And again, it just comes down to being very, very stern about what your goal is, what your mission is and what types of things you absolutely will not tolerate for the sort of folks you know in your circle.

Darrell Stern:
Damn, I love how you’re using, you’re talking about all the different aspects of how stern and comes into all of this. I love it. So how can people get in touch with? What type of services do you provide in your different businesses? And also how can someone get involved with The Starving Dog project?

Tamara Linnan:
I’ll say thank you. Well on Facebook we’re called The Starving Dog. And on there you can see the videos about The Starving Dog and you can message the page. People can message the page if they need mental health services. That’s not an emergency. If it’s an emergency, we need people to call nine one one so we can start getting that going.

Tamara Linnan:
My personal page, Tamara L-I-N-N-A-N. It’s a public page. You can also reach us at touchbasetuesday.com and all the members of The Starving Dog action pack or on that website and they’ll do different things. We have real estate agents and speaker coaches, things like that. But you’re guaranteed if you work with those individuals that they hold uphold the standards of what The Starving Dog is about.

Tamara Linnan:
And so even if you just Google Tamara Linnan and you’ll find me. I am everywhere. And if folks are interested in joining The Starving Dog action pack, I ask them to just go on the page, take a look and see if they think they’re a good fit. And if they are, then we connect and we’ll talk and see what their vision is and if our visions align, then you we simply bring them on and announce them and you get them involved out in the community.

Tamara Linnan:
And the big thing for The Starving Dog action pack members is each and every individual on the team, most of them have their own nonprofits as well, but they help each other. And we’ve, they go out and volunteer at other nonprofit events. They know the importance of not always needing credit for doing things.

Tamara Linnan:
So again, they can find us at The Starving Dog on Facebook, touchbasetuesday.com or my personal page, Tamara, T-A-M-A-R-A Linnan L-I-N-N-A-N and just say hi and let’s connect and see how we can support one another and if they’re a good fit. And a lot of times people don’t give service because they just don’t know where to go. And trust me if you’re out there and you don’t know how you can give back to the community, contact our page, we will find you a nonprofit.

Tamara Linnan:
We’ll find you a way that your talents can be used out in the community. I think the average person wants to give back. Most people do. I think they just feel overwhelmed or they don’t understand where they can go to help other people. And we will certainly put them on a volunteer list for several different organizations so they can get out there community and meet new people and grow.

Tamara Linnan:
And I’ll tell you, when you start going out to give service to other people, if you’re an entrepreneur, your business will grow 10 fold just from going out and giving service to others. I think it’s, Zig Ziglar says, “The quickest way to get what you want in life is to help other people get what they want.” And so just being and doing the right thing will outgrow your business as well. Just by going out and putting other people’s problems first.

Tamara Linnan:
And helping them. And it’s really hard to feel sorry for yourself if you’re out helping someone who you know is a little worse off than you are. So yeah so we’d love to have folks check us out and see if they’re a good fit.

Darrell Stern:
Tamara thank you so much for joining me and getting stern with me today on The Other Stern Show. You are a gift to the world and the world needs your gifts. Thank you so much for being on this episode.

Tamara Linnan:
Well, I appreciate you having me, Darrell. If you guys want to get the ins and outs of SEO and really taking your business to the next level. I know this is the podcast, but you really should reach out to Darrell. He does amazing things and he has definitely helped take The Starving Dog mission to a whole new level with his suggestions and things that he’s done for us. So thank you for having me on and thank you for how you’ve helped my vision grow with the advice that you’ve given. Since we’ve had the blessing to meet one another.

Darrell Stern:
You are very welcome, Tamara. Have an awesome rest of your day and we’re going to have a jam-packed season two here. This is the first of course episode, and what a way to start things off. Tamara is just a gift to the world. Her amount of just wisdom and energy and the way that she serves do get involved. Do reach out and go to The Starving Dog. Do reach out to Tamara and connect with her.

Darrell Stern:
She is amazing, both as a charitable leader of obviously this nonprofit, but also she’s a pretty keen business lady too, in terms of helping your business grow at the same time. So awesome. Thank you very much. This concludes our first episode of season two and we’ll be back with another amazing guest very shortly guys, remember, get stern. You are a gift to the world. The world needs your gifts. Let’s get going.

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